Author Archive

CCA Past President Opens Enviro-Education Centre

Posted on October 30, 2017 by Catherine Ross

On September 30, 2017 the town of Sundridge, Ontario celebrated the opening of the Near North Enviro-Education Centre. The geothermal heated, solar powered, environmentally designed building is the vision of Jocelyn Palm, Director of Glen Bernard Camp where for years the campers have learned to “live lightly.”

The Near North Enviro-Education Centre, which took years to complete, is a testimony to Jocelyn’s vision, financial support and “persistence, perseverance and sheer determination.”

The participants at the ribbon-cutting event demonstrated Joc’s ability to build partnerships to get the job done. Lyle Hall, Mayor of Sundrige, Chris Ellis, Mayor of the Township of Strong, Norman Miller, MPP Muskoka Parry Sound, and Dr. Carolyn Bennett, MP Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs spoke about the three pillars for the project essential to the viability of our rural communities: environmental sustainability, rural economic sustainability and social diversity. Doug Dokis, representing the local indigenous peoples opened with a prayer of thanks in Ojibway and a song in Blackfoot to bless the building.

The mission of the NNEEC is “to help empower rural communities to become models for sustainable living by providing access to education, information and hands on learning opportunities focused on these pillars.”

To learn more, visit the Centre’s website at nneec.ca.

CCA Launches National Marketing Campaign!

Posted on October 2, 2017 by Catherine Ross

At noon EST on October 5, 2017, the Canadian Camping Association launches its national marketing campaign, #ThankstoCamp.

View the inspiring result of the contributions from camps, counsellors and campers across the country telling their amazing stories of the power of camp.

And find out how your camp can still be involved!

CCA Past President Harry Edwards Retires from Camping

Posted on September 5, 2017 by Catherine Ross

On July 4, 2017, John H. Redekop, Chair Stillwood Leadership Board, announced the retirement of Harry Edwards after twenty years of exemplary service:

Harry Edward (left) and his wife Gail.

The Stillwood Camp and Conference Leadership Board announces that after slightly more than 20 years of successful leadership, Harry Edwards, our Executive Director, has decided to retire from full-time leadership of Stillwood, a 100-acre ministry centre located near Cultus Lake in Southwestern British Columbia. Harry has provided strong leadership, always assisted by the extraordinary contribution of his wife Gail. Both Harry and Gail have obviously played major roles in enabling Stillwood to become the award-winning Christian ministry it is today.

Stillwood now ministers to approximately 3,000 campers during the summer season and many hundreds of guest groups from early September to mid-June. Under Harry’s leadership Stillwood now also offers a variety of specialized weekend retreats and conferences.

Harry Edwards has played a major role in bringing Stillwood to a whole new level of excellence and ministry effectiveness. Thousands have benefited from his leadership and hard work. Just as many will long remember the outstanding leadership Gail has provided in food service. The Edwards’ legacy is an impressive one and will be gratefully remembered by many for a very long time.

We wish Harry and his wife Gail safe and happy travels as they check off the places on their long bucket list that they wish to visit.

Think Tank on Camp Research Strategies and Strategic Directions

Posted on June 12, 2017 by Catherine Ross

On May 7, 2017 in Toronto, Dr. Stephen Fine, Chair of the CCA Research Committee, chaired a meeting of CCA Executive Members, John Jorgenson (President of the International Camping Fellowship), and several academics representing various disciplines: education, nursing, architecture, sociology and anthropology, and recreation and leisure studies.  The focus of the Think Tank was to share experience and resources to further research in the phenomena of camp.

Academic participants at the Think Tank on Camp Research included: Dr. Troy Glover, Professor, University of Waterloo; Dr. Karla Henderson, Professor Emeritus, University of North Carolina; Dr. Deb Bialeschki , Professor Emeritus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Dr. Catherine Laing, Assistant Professor University of Calgary; Dr. Thomas McIlwraith, Assistant Professor, University of Guelph and Dr. Trevor Norris, Associate Professor, Brock University; Peter Gilbert, Professor Emeritus, Ryerson University; and John Blakey, Nature Based Learning Teacher and Educational Researcher, Montcrest School.

The group confirmed that the ultimate goal of research in camping is to assist camp professionals in maximizing the experience for campers. Research results have to be understood by camp directors and seen to have practical applications. Currently research is a strong component at International Camping Congresses.  Local camping conferences can also be suitable venues for researchers to share their work. The Waterloo research project, which proved the benefits of camp, is being used in the upcoming national campaign to promote camp. Research has a role to play in educating the public, informing camp professionals and validating and improving the camp experience.

In the Fall of 2017, the CCA will be contacting member camps across the country as to their interest towards participating in an American/Canadian research project. The project’s  aims and methods align with the National Research Council’s work on college and career readiness, which means that reports on the results of this project will help position camp within the broad context of youth development programs.  Interested parties should contact: Stephen Fine by email at sfine@alumni.utoronto.ca.

What Are the Campers Saying?

Posted on May 1, 2017 by Catherine Ross

In the midst of all the work to open and prepare camp for the upcoming season, it is helpful; to remember the reason for all the effort− the campers!

Spring is the season in a camp director’s calendar when suddenly the clock is ticking down.  The time has come to open camp; assess the winter damage and schedule cleaning, repair and/or renovation of buildings.  Back at the city office, there are still a few key staff positions and some camper spots to fill. Lists are created, suppliers have been consulted and the shopping and deliveries have begun.  Another summer season is just around the corner.

In the midst of all the administration and paper pushing, it is revitalizing to recall the reasons behind all the planning and preparations − the campers!

Recently I had the opportunity to read the 2016 reports from the hundreds of campers who were assisted in attending camp last summer by the Kids in Camp Charity.  We all know how important camp is in the lives of children, but sometimes it helps to be reminded in the campers’ own words, why we do what we do.

Let’s hear from the campers:

Camp is “amazing”, “great”, “awesome” and “unforgettable.” “I wouldn’t trade camp for anything.” “I wish I could stay at camp forever.”  “Camp is my favourite place in the world.”

They acquired hard skills – “I got to paddle on white water”, “I learned how to start a fire…flip a kayak…climb thin trees.”  But more importantly, they acquired life skills.  “I learned how to be a better sport.”  “Sometimes even if you miss your parents you can still have fun.”  “I really stepped out of my comfort zone in a way that helped my confidence.” I learned how to conquer fears.” ” I learned that it’s OK to be yourself no matter your differences and imperfections.”  “I learned never to try to be someone you are not.”

Campers with physical, learning or emotional challenges say, “At camp I can be myself and be accepted for who I am.”   “At camp I could be free and not worry about my differences.”  A camper with autism says “I had a few meltdowns but in a non-judgemental place with others who get it.”

These amazing outcomes happen because camp is a community where kids feel that they are welcome, they belong and they are accepted unconditionally. “Camp is a safe place.”  “I’ve never felt more welcomed.”  “Camp is my home away from home.” “I love camp because of the sense of community.”  “At camp they treat you like family right away.” “I feel good at camp.”

Thanks to Isabella, Randeonna, Mandy, Nika, Jude, Morgan, Angela, Taylor, Adam, Cameron, Samantha, Ethan, Logan, Hailey, Annabel, Kira, Parker and Desana for sharing their thoughts about camp.

Thanks to all the camp staff across the country who will be providing amazing experiences for thousands more children in summer 2017.

Cross Country Conversation

Posted on March 20, 2017 by Catherine Ross

In January 2017, Mark Diamond, Chair of the CCA Advocacy Committee, convened a cross-Canada conference call. The participants were: Bronco Cathcart (BC), David Godwin (SK) Jonathan Nyquist (ON), Dara Kahne (day camp director ON), Jacqui Raill (QC), Stephane Richard and John Savage (NB), and Dave Graham (NS).

They discussed minimum wage (now mandatory in some provinces for camp staff), the Early Years Act (a challenge for day camps in Ontario), and the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (an ongoing concern for camps across the country). Four times a year, this committee will convene to discuss issues that all provinces should be aware of so that we can be prepared and understand the legal changes across the country. As a result of this sharing of information, this committee will decide what particular issue(s) should be proactively worked on from a lobbying or government relations perspective. On two of these calls, the Government Relations consultant who has been hired by CCA, Allan Young of Tactix, will report on current concerns and updates of all pending and prospective legislative changes across each province and federally.

We are indebted to this group of camp professionals who are working on our behalf to be proactive rather than reactive to government policy and legislative changes.

2016 Canadian Camping Association Research Award of Excellence Winner

Posted on February 20, 2017 by Catherine Ross

Mandi Baker, CCARAE Winner (2016)

CCA is pleased to announce that Mandi Baker, PhD, Griffith U AUS, is the 2016 winner of the CCARAE for her doctoral dissertation: Becoming and Being a Camp Counsellor: a study of discourse, power relations and emotions.

Mandi attended camps in Southern Ontario as a camper, counsellor and program director. She obtained a Recreation degree at the University of Waterloo and is currently a lecturer at Torrens University, Blue Mountain International Hotel Management School NSW, Australia.

Mandi writes, “While camp counsellor experiences can be immensely positive opportunities for young people to mature and learn about the needs of others, the emotional demands can create pressures that staff struggle to manage.”

Mandi’s paper challenges camp directors to recognize the emotional, physical and mental demands of a counsellor’s job and to provide the necessary support and understanding.

CCA 2016 Award Winners

Posted on January 31, 2017 by Catherine Ross

CCA is proud to recognize camping leaders from across the country who have made exceptional contributions to our industry within their own province and nationally.

Ron Johnstone Lifetime Achievement Award

Joe Kronick

Joe Kronick (second from left) with family and CCA Past President Jill Dundas (centre).

Joe Kronick has been a very active member of the CCA Insurance Committee for well-over 20 years and has made an immense contribution to the great policies that we are now so proud to offer to our CCA and Provincial camp members.

Joe was one of the prime members of an original group of camp professionals who saw that camps needed their own specially written insurance policies to fit their needs quite distinctly from any then available general commercial/business insurance policies.

When CCA made the decision to develop and offer proper insurance coverage to accredited camp members, we were able to benefit from a great deal of the work that Joe and his group had already done. We were extremely pleased when Joe accepted our invitation to join the CCA Insurance Committee and work with us to further develop and hone the policies.

As a committee member, Joe is a tireless worker and took on projects at virtually every meeting. He is the first to complete his tasks and is a huge storehouse of information and sage advice.

Jack Pearse Award of Honour

Mark Diamond

Mark Diamond (right) with CCA Past President Jill Dundas

As Chair of the CCA Government Relations Committee, for the past several years, Mark has devoted countless hours communicating with government officials and meeting with lobbying organizations as he and his committee worked on behalf of all camps affected by new government regulations. He has tackled boating and foreign worker regulations and the Child Care and Early Years Act. In addition, Mark is a member of the OCA Board and in 2016 spear-headed an initiative for Ontario camps to invite new Canadians to attend camp at no cost.

Award of Excellence

Howard Martin

For over 55 years, Howard has worked with children and youth in education and social services. Some of this work has taken him overseas to a South Africa Educational Management Project, an Educational Leadership Project in Trinidad and Tobago and closer to home, the Special Education Pilot Project with the First Nations Educational Council in Quebec. In 2005, he provided support and guidance to the Directors of Youth Protection in Nunavik for four years.

For the past 35 years, Howard’s passion has been Camp Weredale, in the Laurentians, a summer camp for children and youth at risk from foster homes and residential services of the Batshaw Youth and Family Centres in Montreal as well as other referring social agencies. Established in 1934, Camp Weredale is a summer camp for boys and girls, aged five to seventeen, who are receiving youth protection social services.

In the 1980s it became a special needs camp for both boys and girls from the Youth Horizons Reception Centre

In the 1990s (respite) programs of support to foster children and families were added to accommodate this growing category of children

Rob Tiessen

Rob Tiessen (left) with Paul Bailey.

Rob has been a constant example and inspiring leader and mentor for camping in BC for many years. As a counsellor, program staff and now an Executive Director, Rob continues to promote inclusive and traditional camping for all children while also creating space for diversity and progressive change. Rob has continued to push Camp Squeah to be a friend and ally to local Indigenous children, youth and families. Rob has been a long-time volunteer with FCC and BCCA including a number of years helping plan the annual BC Camping Conference

Nick Kitchen

Nick has helped run the, New Brunswick provincial canoe course for the past 15 years. This program has trained countless counsellors, thereby helping camps reach and exceed accreditation standards. Nick has also become the NB representative for Paddle Canada and the advocate for camping on that board. He now works permanently for Camp Centennial, encouraging the growth and success of camping in the province.

Kathy Koehler
Kathy and her husband Gary have provided leadership to the United Church’s Camp Kasota West for over 20 years. Kathy has served on many camping boards including the Canadian Camping Association Board of Directors. Currently Kathy sits on the Alberta Camping Association Board as Vice-President.

Kathy is a strong, calm and quiet leader that many in the camping industry in Alberta and across Canada can look to for wisdom, guidance and support.

Transgender Campers

Posted on January 23, 2017 by Catherine Ross

In the past six years, on three separate occasions, Ted Lockie (Manager, Camp and Youth Programs, Western Canada, Canadian Diabetes Association) received a request from parents asking him if he would register a transgender camper. Ted shares his experience.

When Lockie was asked to register a transgender camper, he did not hesitate. Ted simply asked the parent to identify whether their child chose to live in a female or a male cabin. In all three cases, a female was transitioning to a male. Ted was confident that the child would not behave in any way to make the cabin mates uncomfortable as that would be difficult for themselves as well. In most cases, the other campers were unaware of the gender change. Only the camper’s counsellor and the medical staff were informed.

In Ted’s experience, no problems arose and he received no negative feedback from other parents. He states, “It is not a problem; don’t make it a problem.” Ted is a millennial and completely comfortable with the situation. He speculates that older camp directors may be less at ease because they have had less experience with transgender youth. He considers that the issue may be more of a challenge for those with strong religious beliefs that do not accept gender change.

Ted believes that because camp is an inclusive, accepting, supportive environment, it is a great place for transgender youth to learn how to navigate society. They become accustomed to using a different washroom, have the opportunity to play on a different sports team or even start talking about the changes that they are experiencing.

The Power of Camp

Posted on December 5, 2016 by Catherine Ross

David Graham, Executive Director of Brigadoon Children’s Camp in Nova Scotia, shares a powerful story that could only happen at camp:

As the parents’ cars drove away on arrival day, a small group of boys started an impromptu game of soccer on the playing field.  As more boys arrived, it became apparent that they needed to get organized. “Let’s divide into teams. Shirts and Skins.” Half the boys immediately pulled off their T-shirts, tossed them to the sidelines and play continued.  As Dave explained it, this would never happen at school or at the neighbourhood park − because every camper’s chest revealed a long scar from cardiac surgery.

Brigadoon Village is a year round facility that offers camp programming to children and youth with a chronic illness, chronic condition or special needs.  Similarly, at camps for children with diabetes, no one stares or questions when a camper steps aside in the middle of an activity and self-administers insulin.  At camps for children with exceptionalities, where campers are no different from their cabin mates, they can be themselves and gain the strength and confidence to live happily in the real world where they are perceived as different.

Such is the power of camp.